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Three Romances for cello and piano Op.94

Robert Schumann (b. 1810 - d. 1856)

Leonard Elschenbroich (photo credit: Felix Broede)

Leonard Elschenbroich (photo credit: Felix Broede)

Composer
Robert Schumann (b. 1810 - d. 1856)
Composition Year
1849
Work Movements
1. Nicht schnell
2. Einfach, innig
3. Nicht schnell
Artists
Alexei Grynyuk [piano], Leonard Elschenbroich [cello]

Programme Note Writer:
© Ian Fox

Schumann wrote these three short pieces in 1849, a time when political and military revolution was sweeping through Dresden. The family escaped to a friend's house at Maxen. Despite the stormy times Schumann paid little heed to contemporary events and busied himself with a stream of compositions, particularly songs. His wife Clara, wrote in her diary: All the songs breathe the spirit of perfect peace, they seem to me like spring, and laugh like blossoming flowers.  As well as writing these songs Schumann also created these Romances, as well as his charming Waldscenen for piano and completed his Scenes from Faust in time for the centenary of the poet Goethe's centenary that August.

The Three Romances were published in 1851 and are described as being for oboe (or violin or clarinet) on the manuscript and demonstrate the composer's interest in less usual instrumental combinations. It was not long before a cello transcription was produced and they are usually heard in this form today, the second Romance being particularly popular and often recorded. The first, marked not quickly, presents a gently moving song. Number two is subtitled: simple, heartfelt and, as Clara observed, there is a spring-like joy about its attractive melody. It has a stormier central section and is the most typical of the composer's mature style. The final Romance returns to the calm of the first piece.

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Three Romances for cello and piano Op.94

Composer: Robert Schumann (b. 1810 - d. 1856)
Performance date: Friday 1st July 2011
Venue: Bantry House Library, Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland,

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Composer Robert Schumann (b. 1810 - d. 1856)
Work Title Three Romances for cello and piano Op.94
Composition Year 1849
Work Movements 1. Nicht schnell
2. Einfach, innig
3. Nicht schnell
Artist(s) Alexei Grynyuk [piano], Leonard Elschenbroich [cello]
Performance Date Friday 1st July 2011
Performance Venue Bantry House Library, Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland,
Event Main Evening Concert
Duration 00:13:08
Recording Engineer Anton Timoney, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Duo
Instrumentation vc, pf
Programme Note Writer © Ian Fox
Schumann wrote these three short pieces in 1849, a time when political and military revolution was sweeping through Dresden. The family escaped to a friend's house at Maxen. Despite the stormy times Schumann paid little heed to contemporary events and busied himself with a stream of compositions, particularly songs. His wife Clara, wrote in her diary: All the songs breathe the spirit of perfect peace, they seem to me like spring, and laugh like blossoming flowers.  As well as writing these songs Schumann also created these Romances, as well as his charming Waldscenen for piano and completed his Scenes from Faust in time for the centenary of the poet Goethe's centenary that August.

The Three Romances were published in 1851 and are described as being for oboe (or violin or clarinet) on the manuscript and demonstrate the composer's interest in less usual instrumental combinations. It was not long before a cello transcription was produced and they are usually heard in this form today, the second Romance being particularly popular and often recorded. The first, marked not quickly, presents a gently moving song. Number two is subtitled: simple, heartfelt and, as Clara observed, there is a spring-like joy about its attractive melody. It has a stormier central section and is the most typical of the composer's mature style. The final Romance returns to the calm of the first piece.