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Toccata in D minor for Piano Op.11

Sergei Prokofiev (b. 1891 - d. 1953)

Tamar Beraia

Tamar Beraia

Composer
Sergei Prokofiev (b. 1891 - d. 1953)
Composition Year
1912
Artists
Tamar Beraia [piano]

Programme Note Writer:
© Francis Humphrys

In December 1908, the seventeen-year-old Prokofiev gave his début concert at the St Petersburg Evenings of Contemporary Music. The audience loved his wild, unbridled fantasy and from then on the composer-pianist made his piano works not only vehicles for daring harmonic experiments but also conscious attempts to bedazzle and shock.

The ferocious Toccata was clearly designed by the young firebrand to leave audiences stunned by his virtuosity and to add to his reputation as an enfant terrible. It was doubtless composed as an encore piece to round off his increasingly successful recitals, while its publication acted as a challenge to other pianists. It was unlike anything heard before – manic, driving, percussive and dissonant, the devil let loose on the keyboard

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Toccata in D minor for Piano Op.11

Composer: Sergei Prokofiev (b. 1891 - d. 1953)
Performance date: Saturday 2nd July 2016
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

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Composer Sergei Prokofiev (b. 1891 - d. 1953)
Work Title Toccata in D minor for Piano Op.11
Composition Year 1912
Artist(s) Tamar Beraia [piano]
Performance Date Saturday 2nd July 2016
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Crespo Series
Duration 00:04:20
Recording Engineer Richard McCullough, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Solo
Instrumentation pf
Programme Note Writer © Francis Humphrys

In December 1908, the seventeen-year-old Prokofiev gave his début concert at the St Petersburg Evenings of Contemporary Music. The audience loved his wild, unbridled fantasy and from then on the composer-pianist made his piano works not only vehicles for daring harmonic experiments but also conscious attempts to bedazzle and shock.

The ferocious Toccata was clearly designed by the young firebrand to leave audiences stunned by his virtuosity and to add to his reputation as an enfant terrible. It was doubtless composed as an encore piece to round off his increasingly successful recitals, while its publication acted as a challenge to other pianists. It was unlike anything heard before – manic, driving, percussive and dissonant, the devil let loose on the keyboard