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Lebensstürme in A minor D.947

Franz Schubert (b. 1797 - d. 1828)

Cedric Pescia (photo credit: Uwe Neumann)

Cedric Pescia (photo credit: Uwe Neumann)

Composer
Franz Schubert (b. 1797 - d. 1828)
Composition Year
1828
Artists
Philippe Cassard [piano], Cédric Pescia [piano]

Programme Note Writer:
© Ian Fox

Schubert wrote two of his piano duets in quick succession: the F minor Fantasie D.940  in April 1828 and this splendid composition that May. It has proved a popular work and his publisher Diabelli later added the title Lebensstürme or Life’s Storms.There has been speculation that it may have been meant as the first movement of a full sonata for which  the A major Rondo D.951 might also be a part,  but nothing so far has been found to prove this. It certainly is in an adventurous version of sonata-form - instead of the usual linked themes a fifth apart, he introduces widely separated harmonic structures: the first pair of themes in A minor and the second in A-flat major. 

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Lebensstürme in A minor D.947

Composer: Franz Schubert (b. 1797 - d. 1828)
Performance date: Saturday 28th June 2014
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

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http://archive.westcorkmusic.ie/details/view/cmf/345

Composer Franz Schubert (b. 1797 - d. 1828)
Work Title Lebensstürme in A minor D.947
Composition Year 1828
Artist(s) Philippe Cassard [piano], Cédric Pescia [piano]
Performance Date Saturday 28th June 2014
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Crespo Recital Series
Duration 00:11:34
Recording Engineer Richard McCullough, RTE
Instrumentation Category Duo
Instrumentation 2pf
Programme Note Writer © Ian Fox

Schubert wrote two of his piano duets in quick succession: the F minor Fantasie D.940  in April 1828 and this splendid composition that May. It has proved a popular work and his publisher Diabelli later added the title Lebensstürme or Life’s Storms.There has been speculation that it may have been meant as the first movement of a full sonata for which  the A major Rondo D.951 might also be a part,  but nothing so far has been found to prove this. It certainly is in an adventurous version of sonata-form - instead of the usual linked themes a fifth apart, he introduces widely separated harmonic structures: the first pair of themes in A minor and the second in A-flat major.