VISIT WESTCORKMUSIC.IE

LATEST ADDITION TO THE ARCHIVE

Sonata sopra La Monica, from ‘Sonate, symphonie, canzoni, passe'mezzi, baletti, corenti, gagliarde e retornelli’ Op.8

Biagio Marini (d. 1663

Ruby Hughes

Ruby Hughes

Composer
Biagio Marini (d. 1663
Composition Year
1629
Artists
Elbipolis Barockorchester Hamburg (Albrecht Kühner [violin], David Maria Gramse [violin], Kate Hearne [cello], Andreas Arend [theorbo], Veronika Brass [harpsichord]), Ruby Hughes [mezzo-soprano]

Programme Note Writer:
© Kate Hearne

Biagio Marini was a virtuoso violinist and a composer, born in Brescia in the North of Italy. He was a very well travelled man, holding positions in Belgium, Germany and throughout Italy, and in 1615 he joined Monteverdi’s ensemble at St. Mark’s Cathedral in Venice. Although much of his output is lost, both the solo and instrumental violin music which has survived exhibits an inventiveness and a boldness that was way ahead of his time. The first use of double and triple stopping can be found in Marini’s works, as well as explicitly notated tremolo effects and the use of scordatura tuning.

The trio sonata La Monica is taken from one of the most extensive collections of violin literature of the seventeenth century: 69 compositions which Marini wrote in 1626 while in Neuberg on the Danube and published three years later in Venice as his Opus 8. At first glance, Marini’s work doesn’t seem to bear all that much resemblance to the popular Italian folk tune, La Monica, but on close analysis, there are harmonic similarities and appearances of small snippets of the tune throughout. La Monica tells the story of a young girl forced to become a nun against her will, which seems to be a recurring theme in Italian Folklore from Mediaeval and Renaissance times. The memorable opening theme in the upper voices reappears throughout the piece, interspersed with passages of free variations.

FULL DETAILS SEARCH FOR MORE

Sonata sopra La Monica, from ‘Sonate, symphonie, canzoni, passe'mezzi, baletti, corenti, gagliarde e retornelli’ Op.8

Composer: Biagio Marini (d. 1663
Performance date: Monday 1st July 2013
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

Share on Twitter | Share on Facebook
http://archive.westcorkmusic.ie/details/view/cmf/301

Composer Biagio Marini (d. 1663
Work Title Sonata sopra La Monica, from ‘Sonate, symphonie, canzoni, passe'mezzi, baletti, corenti, gagliarde e retornelli’ Op.8
Composition Year 1629
Artist(s) Elbipolis Barockorchester Hamburg (Albrecht Kühner [violin], David Maria Gramse [violin], Kate Hearne [cello], Andreas Arend [theorbo], Veronika Brass [harpsichord]), Ruby Hughes [mezzo-soprano]
Performance Date Monday 1st July 2013
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Coffee Concert
Duration 00:03:54
Recording Engineer Damian Chennells, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Small Mixed Ensemble
Instrumentation S-solo, 2vn, vc, lu, hpd
Programme Note Writer © Kate Hearne

Biagio Marini was a virtuoso violinist and a composer, born in Brescia in the North of Italy. He was a very well travelled man, holding positions in Belgium, Germany and throughout Italy, and in 1615 he joined Monteverdi’s ensemble at St. Mark’s Cathedral in Venice. Although much of his output is lost, both the solo and instrumental violin music which has survived exhibits an inventiveness and a boldness that was way ahead of his time. The first use of double and triple stopping can be found in Marini’s works, as well as explicitly notated tremolo effects and the use of scordatura tuning.

The trio sonata La Monica is taken from one of the most extensive collections of violin literature of the seventeenth century: 69 compositions which Marini wrote in 1626 while in Neuberg on the Danube and published three years later in Venice as his Opus 8. At first glance, Marini’s work doesn’t seem to bear all that much resemblance to the popular Italian folk tune, La Monica, but on close analysis, there are harmonic similarities and appearances of small snippets of the tune throughout. La Monica tells the story of a young girl forced to become a nun against her will, which seems to be a recurring theme in Italian Folklore from Mediaeval and Renaissance times. The memorable opening theme in the upper voices reappears throughout the piece, interspersed with passages of free variations.