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Figaro

Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (b. 1895 - d. 1968)

Vadim Gluzman

Vadim Gluzman

Composer
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (b. 1895 - d. 1968)
Composition Year
1931
Artists
Angela Yoffe [piano], Vadim Gluzman [violin]

Programme Note Writer:
© Francis Humphrys

Figaro – Concert transcription from Rossini’s Barber of Seville [edited by Jascha Heifetz 1931]

This mind-boggling transcription was created by Castelnuovo-Tedesco and his friend, the legendary violinist Jascha Heifetz, in order to make a brilliantly impressive encore to follow Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s Second Violin Concerto that Heifetz had commissioned. It was based on the well-known cavatina Largo al Factotum from Rossini’s Barber of Seville, where the fixer extraordinaie, the Barber himself in exuberant form sings exultantly about how all Seville needs him – Tutti mi chiedono, tutti mi vogliono. Here we have Rossini’s most famous crescendo -

Figaro…Figaro...Figaro

Ahimè, che furia!

Ahimè, che folla!

Una alla volta,

Per carità!

Ehi…Figaro...Son qua

Figaro qua, Figaro là

Figaro su, Figaro giú.

Pronto prontissimo

Son come il fulmine

Sono il factotum

Della città.

Ah bravo Figaro!

Bravo, bravissimo

A te fortuna non manchera

- all translated dazzlingly for the violin. All the impossible virtuoso fireworks were clearly concocted to show off the superb technique of Heifetz and the select few who can follow in his footsteps.

Castelnuovo-Tedesco was himself from Florence, son of a rich Jewish banker. His musical career began spectacularly and he is particularly well-known for his guitar compositions – over 120 of them - written after he met Segovia in 1932. Like so many Jewish composers of those times he emigrated to the USA with the help of Toscanini and Heifetz just before war broke out. Perhaps inevitably he ended up moving to Hollywood where he became a major film score composer for Metro-Goldwyn.

 

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Figaro

Composer: Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (b. 1895 - d. 1968)
Performance date: Sunday 27th June 2010
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

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Composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (b. 1895 - d. 1968)
Work Title Figaro
Composition Year 1931
Artist(s) Angela Yoffe [piano], Vadim Gluzman [violin]
Performance Date Sunday 27th June 2010
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Stars in the Afternoon
Duration 00:05:44
Recording Engineer Anton Timoney, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Duo
Instrumentation vn, pf
Programme Note Writer © Francis Humphrys

Figaro – Concert transcription from Rossini’s Barber of Seville [edited by Jascha Heifetz 1931]

This mind-boggling transcription was created by Castelnuovo-Tedesco and his friend, the legendary violinist Jascha Heifetz, in order to make a brilliantly impressive encore to follow Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s Second Violin Concerto that Heifetz had commissioned. It was based on the well-known cavatina Largo al Factotum from Rossini’s Barber of Seville, where the fixer extraordinaie, the Barber himself in exuberant form sings exultantly about how all Seville needs him – Tutti mi chiedono, tutti mi vogliono. Here we have Rossini’s most famous crescendo -

Figaro…Figaro...Figaro

Ahimè, che furia!

Ahimè, che folla!

Una alla volta,

Per carità!

Ehi…Figaro...Son qua

Figaro qua, Figaro là

Figaro su, Figaro giú.

Pronto prontissimo

Son come il fulmine

Sono il factotum

Della città.

Ah bravo Figaro!

Bravo, bravissimo

A te fortuna non manchera

- all translated dazzlingly for the violin. All the impossible virtuoso fireworks were clearly concocted to show off the superb technique of Heifetz and the select few who can follow in his footsteps.

Castelnuovo-Tedesco was himself from Florence, son of a rich Jewish banker. His musical career began spectacularly and he is particularly well-known for his guitar compositions – over 120 of them - written after he met Segovia in 1932. Like so many Jewish composers of those times he emigrated to the USA with the help of Toscanini and Heifetz just before war broke out. Perhaps inevitably he ended up moving to Hollywood where he became a major film score composer for Metro-Goldwyn.