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Concerto in F major TWV 51:F1

Georg Philipp Telemann (b. 1681 - d. 1767)

Kate Hearne (photo credit: Maria Neumuller)

Kate Hearne (photo credit: Maria Neumuller)

Composer
Georg Philipp Telemann (b. 1681 - d. 1767)
Composition Year
unknown
Work Movements
1. Affettuoso
2. Allegro
3. Adagio
4. Minuet I & II
Artists
Sarah Sexton [violin], Mihaela Girardi [violin], Rebecca Jones [viola], Sarah McMahon [cello], Sarah Halpin [double bass], Malcolm Proud [harpsichord]

Programme Note Writer:
© Kate Hearne

Although Telemann kept control over the distribution of his music by running his own publishing house, many of his surviving scores exist in copies made by his good friends Samuel Endler and Darmstadt’sHofkapellmeister, Chistoph Graupner. One such exquisitely rendered manuscript, sadly undated, proves to be the earliest source of Telemann’s F major concerto. There are, however, many factors leading us to believe that this is an early work of Telemann’s, dating from his Eisenach years. The adoption of Corelli’s four-movement concerto da chiesa form shows no sign of the ritornello passages made popular by the publication of Vivaldi’s L’estro armonico in 1711, of which Telemann was to later become very fond. The scoring is relatively simple, showing a lack of development between the orchestra and soloist. Much of the time the solo passages on the recorder are sparsely accompanied, to the extent that in the adagio movement Telemann chooses to omit the upper strings altogether. The use of the French minuet and doubleto end the piece is one of the first examples of a trend that would later become integrated into the early Classical symphonic form, demonstrating the delight Telemann took in mixing different styles in a new and inventive way. This concerto is full of charm, humor, and virtuosity, cleverly utilising the natural language and technique of the recorder, giving testament to fact that Telemann was himself an eminent performer of the instrument.

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Concerto in F major TWV 51:F1

Composer: Georg Philipp Telemann (b. 1681 - d. 1767)
Performance date: Wednesday 30th June 2010
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

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Composer Georg Philipp Telemann (b. 1681 - d. 1767)
Work Title Concerto in F major TWV 51:F1
Composition Year unknown
Work Movements 1. Affettuoso
2. Allegro
3. Adagio
4. Minuet I & II
Artist(s) Sarah Sexton [violin], Mihaela Girardi [violin], Rebecca Jones [viola], Sarah McMahon [cello], Sarah Halpin [double bass], Malcolm Proud [harpsichord]
Performance Date Wednesday 30th June 2010
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Coffee Concert
Duration 00:14:06
Recording Engineer Anton Timoney, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Small Mixed Ensemble
Instrumentation rec, 2vn, va, vc, db, hpd
Programme Note Writer © Kate Hearne

Although Telemann kept control over the distribution of his music by running his own publishing house, many of his surviving scores exist in copies made by his good friends Samuel Endler and Darmstadt’sHofkapellmeister, Chistoph Graupner. One such exquisitely rendered manuscript, sadly undated, proves to be the earliest source of Telemann’s F major concerto. There are, however, many factors leading us to believe that this is an early work of Telemann’s, dating from his Eisenach years. The adoption of Corelli’s four-movement concerto da chiesa form shows no sign of the ritornello passages made popular by the publication of Vivaldi’s L’estro armonico in 1711, of which Telemann was to later become very fond. The scoring is relatively simple, showing a lack of development between the orchestra and soloist. Much of the time the solo passages on the recorder are sparsely accompanied, to the extent that in the adagio movement Telemann chooses to omit the upper strings altogether. The use of the French minuet and doubleto end the piece is one of the first examples of a trend that would later become integrated into the early Classical symphonic form, demonstrating the delight Telemann took in mixing different styles in a new and inventive way. This concerto is full of charm, humor, and virtuosity, cleverly utilising the natural language and technique of the recorder, giving testament to fact that Telemann was himself an eminent performer of the instrument.