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Toccata Arpeggiata / Kapsberger, Ground

Girolamo Kapsberger (b. 1580 - d. 1651)

Kate Hearne (photo credit: Maria Neumuller)

Kate Hearne (photo credit: Maria Neumuller)

Composer
Girolamo Kapsberger (b. 1580 - d. 1651)
Composition Year
1604 / 1640
Artists
Joanna Boślak-Górniok [harpsichord], Cristina Zavalloni [mezzo-soprano], Kate Hearne [recorder/cello], Dohyo Sol [theorbo/archlute]

Programme Note Writer:
© Kate Hearne

Despite his Austrian name, Kapsberger was born and educated in Venice. During his lifetime he gained the reputation as being a brilliant virtuoso of the lute, and after settling in Rome in 1605 he began to write and publish multiple collections for the instrument. Although the lute was in favour at the time as being the instrument of choice to accompany the new genre of the monodic song, Kapsberger was the one responsible for ensuring that the lute, theorbo and chitarrone all had bright futures as solo instruments in their own right. He worked alongside Frescobaldi for some years in the service of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, and it’s clear that Kapsberger’s music, especially his toccatas, influenced the compositions of Frescobaldi. As with the two short works in today’s concert, Kapsberger’s music displays the innovative view of harmonic contrasts and rhythmic ingenuity which earned him much respect in his lifetime. These pieces are from volumes of solo music that Kapsberger wrote for the chitarrone, a large lute instrument with 7 or 8 open bass strings and 6 fretted strings on the fingerboard, using the same tuning as the Renaissance guitar or chitarra. From about 1600 onward, the word tiorba started appearing alongside chitarrone to mean the same instrument. This was confirmed by Agostino Agazzari in his treatise on continuo published in 1607, and finally by Kapsberger himself in 1640. 

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Toccata Arpeggiata / Kapsberger, Ground

Composer: Girolamo Kapsberger (b. 1580 - d. 1651)
Performance date: Sunday 1st July 2012
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

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Composer Girolamo Kapsberger (b. 1580 - d. 1651)
Work Title Toccata Arpeggiata / Kapsberger, Ground
Composition Year 1604 / 1640
Artist(s) Joanna Boślak-Górniok [harpsichord], Cristina Zavalloni [mezzo-soprano], Kate Hearne [recorder/cello], Dohyo Sol [theorbo/archlute]
Performance Date Sunday 1st July 2012
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Coffee Concert
Duration 00:05:55
Recording Engineer Anton Timoney, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Small Mixed Ensemble
Instrumentation Mez-solo, rec vc, lu, hpd
Programme Note Writer © Kate Hearne

Despite his Austrian name, Kapsberger was born and educated in Venice. During his lifetime he gained the reputation as being a brilliant virtuoso of the lute, and after settling in Rome in 1605 he began to write and publish multiple collections for the instrument. Although the lute was in favour at the time as being the instrument of choice to accompany the new genre of the monodic song, Kapsberger was the one responsible for ensuring that the lute, theorbo and chitarrone all had bright futures as solo instruments in their own right. He worked alongside Frescobaldi for some years in the service of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, and it’s clear that Kapsberger’s music, especially his toccatas, influenced the compositions of Frescobaldi. As with the two short works in today’s concert, Kapsberger’s music displays the innovative view of harmonic contrasts and rhythmic ingenuity which earned him much respect in his lifetime. These pieces are from volumes of solo music that Kapsberger wrote for the chitarrone, a large lute instrument with 7 or 8 open bass strings and 6 fretted strings on the fingerboard, using the same tuning as the Renaissance guitar or chitarra. From about 1600 onward, the word tiorba started appearing alongside chitarrone to mean the same instrument. This was confirmed by Agostino Agazzari in his treatise on continuo published in 1607, and finally by Kapsberger himself in 1640.