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Mariel

Osvaldo Golijov (b. 1960)

Andreas Brantelid (photo credit: Sussie Ahlburg )

Andreas Brantelid (photo credit: Sussie Ahlburg )

Composer
Osvaldo Golijov (b. 1960)
Composition Year
1999
Artists
Ji Hye Jung [marimba], Andreas Brantelid [cello]

Programme Note Writer:
© Francis Humphrys

I wrote the original version of Mariel for cello and marimba, when I learned of the death in an accident of my friend Mariel Stubrin. I attempted to capture that short instant before grief, in which one learns of the sudden death of a friend who was full of life: a single moment frozen forever in one’s memory, and which reverberates through the piece, in the waves and echoes of Brazilian music that Mariel loved. Osvaldo Golijov

Golijov was born and brought up in Argentina and learnt about music from his pianist mother. When he was ten years old his parents took him to hear Astor Piazzolla. This was a defining moment, music was suddenly no longer something found in a score, it was alive and real: I could see not only life being distilled into music, but also how Bach and Bartók could be transmuted into something that was vital to Argentina at that moment, and into my life at that moment.

Golijov speaks of himself as a gestural composer, a comment performers will understand for the first tempo indication in Mariel is like an asteroid. In the same way as he speaks of a loose connection between musical gesture and notation, he also speaks of an important connection between his Jewish heritage and the interpretation of his music. His emphasis however is on drawing from one culture to better articulate universal human feelings and experiences. He feels some cultures have explored differenet aspects of the human soul more deeply than others, leading him to select certain specific influences when he wishes to evoke a particular emotion, for instance Spanish flamenco flavours when infusing his music with despair.

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Mariel

Composer: Osvaldo Golijov (b. 1960)
Performance date: Wednesday 4th July 2012
Venue: St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland

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Composer Osvaldo Golijov (b. 1960)
Work Title Mariel
Composition Year 1999
Artist(s) Ji Hye Jung [marimba], Andreas Brantelid [cello]
Performance Date Wednesday 4th July 2012
Performance Venue St. Brendan's Church, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland
Event Late night concert
Duration 00:10:46
Recording Engineer Anton Timoney, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Duo
Instrumentation mar, vc
Programme Note Writer © Francis Humphrys

I wrote the original version of Mariel for cello and marimba, when I learned of the death in an accident of my friend Mariel Stubrin. I attempted to capture that short instant before grief, in which one learns of the sudden death of a friend who was full of life: a single moment frozen forever in one’s memory, and which reverberates through the piece, in the waves and echoes of Brazilian music that Mariel loved. Osvaldo Golijov

Golijov was born and brought up in Argentina and learnt about music from his pianist mother. When he was ten years old his parents took him to hear Astor Piazzolla. This was a defining moment, music was suddenly no longer something found in a score, it was alive and real: I could see not only life being distilled into music, but also how Bach and Bartók could be transmuted into something that was vital to Argentina at that moment, and into my life at that moment.

Golijov speaks of himself as a gestural composer, a comment performers will understand for the first tempo indication in Mariel is like an asteroid. In the same way as he speaks of a loose connection between musical gesture and notation, he also speaks of an important connection between his Jewish heritage and the interpretation of his music. His emphasis however is on drawing from one culture to better articulate universal human feelings and experiences. He feels some cultures have explored differenet aspects of the human soul more deeply than others, leading him to select certain specific influences when he wishes to evoke a particular emotion, for instance Spanish flamenco flavours when infusing his music with despair.