"

VISIT WESTCORKMUSIC.IE

LATEST ADDITION TO THE ARCHIVE

Duo No.1 in C major for flute and bassoon from WoO27

Ludwig van Beethoven (b. 1770 - d. 1827)

Peter Whelan (photo credit: Martin Usborne)

Peter Whelan (photo credit: Martin Usborne)

Composer
Ludwig van Beethoven (b. 1770 - d. 1827)
Composition Year
1790-1792
Artists
Peter Whelan [bassoon], William Dowdall [flute]

Programme Note Writer:
© Francis Humphrys

The headings above are doubly dubious. This work was originally written for clarinet and bassoon  and, even more alarmingly, Grove insists that this work is ‘probably spurious’. The set of three Duos that make up WoO 27 was first published in Paris some time before 1815. If authentic it was undoubtedly a very early work dating from 1786-90 when Beethoven was still living in Bonn.

One of Beethoven’s very early works was a Trio for piano, flute and bassoon that he wrote in 1786 for the members of the family of Count Friedrich von Westerholt. The Count was chief equerry to the Maximilian Franz Archbishop Elector of Cologne (whose Court was in Bonn) and was also a bassoon player, while one of his sons played the flute. Perhaps more significantly his daughter, Maria Anna, was one of Beethoven’s piano students so he would have visited the family regularly.

There are very few Beethoven manuscripts dating to before 1784 and it is conjectured that they may have been lost in the disastrous floods of February 1784, when Beethoven and his landlord, Theodor Fischer, had to be rescued from their house close to the Rhine. The three Duos could have dated from those early days bearing in mind it was common practice at the time to adapt such music to other instruments as the need or the occasion arose. As it happens the C major Duo conveniently avoids the lower chalumeau register and all its notes lay comfortably within the flute’s range. This may well have been intentional for this accomodating and delightful Tafelmusik.

FULL DETAILS SEARCH FOR MORE

Duo No.1 in C major for flute and bassoon from WoO27

Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven (b. 1770 - d. 1827)
Performance date: Saturday 7th July 2012
Venue: Bantry House Library, Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland,

Share on Twitter | Share on Facebook
http://archive.westcorkmusic.ie/details/view/cmf/146

Composer Ludwig van Beethoven (b. 1770 - d. 1827)
Work Title Duo No.1 in C major for flute and bassoon from WoO27
Composition Year 1790-1792
Artist(s) Peter Whelan [bassoon], William Dowdall [flute]
Performance Date Saturday 7th July 2012
Performance Venue Bantry House Library, Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland,
Event Finale
Duration 00:08:55
Recording Engineer Anton Timoney, RTÉ lyric fm
Instrumentation Category Duo
Instrumentation fl, bn
Programme Note Writer © Francis Humphrys

The headings above are doubly dubious. This work was originally written for clarinet and bassoon  and, even more alarmingly, Grove insists that this work is ‘probably spurious’. The set of three Duos that make up WoO 27 was first published in Paris some time before 1815. If authentic it was undoubtedly a very early work dating from 1786-90 when Beethoven was still living in Bonn.

One of Beethoven’s very early works was a Trio for piano, flute and bassoon that he wrote in 1786 for the members of the family of Count Friedrich von Westerholt. The Count was chief equerry to the Maximilian Franz Archbishop Elector of Cologne (whose Court was in Bonn) and was also a bassoon player, while one of his sons played the flute. Perhaps more significantly his daughter, Maria Anna, was one of Beethoven’s piano students so he would have visited the family regularly.

There are very few Beethoven manuscripts dating to before 1784 and it is conjectured that they may have been lost in the disastrous floods of February 1784, when Beethoven and his landlord, Theodor Fischer, had to be rescued from their house close to the Rhine. The three Duos could have dated from those early days bearing in mind it was common practice at the time to adapt such music to other instruments as the need or the occasion arose. As it happens the C major Duo conveniently avoids the lower chalumeau register and all its notes lay comfortably within the flute’s range. This may well have been intentional for this accomodating and delightful Tafelmusik.